STUDY SATs, PREPARE ON MY OWN.

(HOW HARD CAN IT BE?)


WHERE DO I START?

font=red/font> Study SATs: Read this page, and see our Study Guide for doing it on your own.


Check the College Board Web site for policy on sending scores, cancellation, changing test dates, how scores are sent, how scores are managed.

Even if taking an SAT Class, you should still familiarize yourself with all the information about the exam, and the COLLEGE BOARD: SATs, SAT IIs, all AP Classes. College Board

Study SATs. Bet you can't wait.

You begin your preparation for the SATs by planning, and buying a couple of books, OR: you can sign up for some very expensive classes to do what you can do by yourself, with a little will power.

The exam material can be managed by anyone with a few study guides, and some regular time spent in studying. The place you might need extra help is in writing/evaluating your practice essays.

You could also try to make a deal with your parents that if you get a 1600 on the SAT I Exam, studying by yourself, they could give you the money classes would cost, for a car...

First, you take the PSAT . in October of either your sophomore or junior year (or both) of high school.The test counts for National Merit awards only in the junior year.

- For students in the junior year of high school, high enough scores qualify you for Nation Merit Scholarships or National Merit Recognition, a big deal).

  • Study results of the PSAT carefully and thoroughly; this will identify your strengths and weaknesses to help you prepare for the regular SAT.

      I am of the opinion that there are three reasons to take the PSAT: the possibility of National Merit Scholar recognition, getting the "feel" of the SAY test environment, and practicing for the real test. However, unless you are studying for the National Merit Awards, keep your mind on preparing for the actual SAT I Reasoning Exam, instead of worrying about the PSAT, a shorter version of the SAT, with no essay.

    • Ideally you should plan to take your SAT II Subject Matter Tests in May or June of your junior year in high school. Sign up for exams in those subjects in which you excel, AP classes, or other subjects in which you are currently enrolled.

      Then Study for the SATs

      TOP SAT Tips and Strategies

    • Plan your SAT I test dates to allow yourself time to take it a second time, if necessary. This means taking it for the first time no later than June of your junior year in high school so you can take it again in the fall, if necessary. First test is in August, next is in September.

    • Aim at taking the test no more than three times.

    • Analyze yourself and your study habits to decide the best way for you to prepare.

    • Don't get locked in to a particular study plan. If studying on your own does not produce improvements in self-testing results, reevaluate in case you need to hire a coach or enroll in a class.

    • Purchase "Ten Real SATs," published by College Board. The tests to study, as in THE College Board.

    • Set aside a set time each day to Study SATs.

    • Register for the test

  • The College Board, Register for the Exam


    Free SAT Practice Exams

    Princeton Review Practice SATs

    The CollegeBoard Practice Tests, with scoring, and anlysis

    Four (4) tests, Online practice exams

    Peterson's Free Exams


    SEE OUR STUDY GUIDE FOR DOING IT ON YOUR OWN

    SAT Questions and Answers

    The SAT and the ACT Essays

    Exam tips and strategies

    SAT and ACT introduction page

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